Plasticine Putin

After living in Russia for over a year, I decided to start this blog to share what I see and experience every day, living in the largest country on Earth and one certainly filled with co-existing opposites. The blog is called Russia Through The Lens, not just because I publish one (or more) picture I... Continue Reading →

The Lady of the Korolenko

The town of Vyborg lies on the Karelian Isthmus near the head of the Vyborg Bay, 130 km (81 miles) to the northwest of St. Petersburg and 38 km (24 miles) south of Russia's border with Finland, where the Saimaa Canal enters the Gulf of Finland. The town has changed hands several times in history, most recently in 1944 when the Soviet Union captured it from Finland during World... Continue Reading →

Travel on Russia’s Olympic Train

In 2009, Russian Railways made an order with Siemens for a development of an electric multiple unit train adapted to the Russian environment. The new trains were planned to be used in Sochi for suburban passenger traffic during the 2014 Winter Olympics, and then to be partially transferred to other train lines. Now, three and a half years after the Games, you... Continue Reading →

100 days, 100 posts

Time flies, when you are having fun. That's how the old saying goes and I guess it also applies when you are posting your impressions on the largest country in the world: Russia. Since June 10th, when I published my first post with the first picture I ever took in Russia, another 99 have followed,... Continue Reading →

The Tower in the Terminal

To serve its almost 20,000,000 (yes, twenty million!) inhabitants, the city of Moscow can count on nine railway terminals and four international airports: Domodedovo, Sheremetyevo, Zhukovsky, and Vnukovo. Today I want to talk about the last one in this list and, in particular, abut a rather unique architectural solution. Vnukovo is Moscow's oldest operating airport and it is the highest... Continue Reading →

Black sky and white Volga

Coming from the warmer climate of Italy, my native country, I am still very much fascinated by the frozen rivers of Russia. Especially the large and very large ones, like the Volga, which turn completely white in winter once they are covered in snow. If you've been reading this blog, you also know I am deeply intrigued by the possibility of visiting Russian cities and regions that were once completely off-limits to foreigners (and to most Russians, as well) under Soviet Union law. The picture above combines both of this element and maybe that is why it means a lot to me.

The magnificently eclectic Farmer’s Palace in Kazan

Situated in Kazan the capital and largest city of he Republic of Tatarstan, the Farmer's Palace is a pretty unique building. It serves as the headquarters of the Ministry of Agriculture and Food of the Republic of Tatarstan (link in Russian), the Chief Veterinary Department, the State Enterprise "RACIN" and a number of other organizations. Amongst these the Agriculture Ministry is by far the most important, as the sector saw a very significant grow in the last number of years and today represents 5.1% of the total revenue of the republic.

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