The Lady of the Korolenko

The town of Vyborg lies on the Karelian Isthmus near the head of the Vyborg Bay, 130 km (81 miles) to the northwest of St. Petersburg and 38 km (24 miles) south of Russia's border with Finland, where the Saimaa Canal enters the Gulf of Finland. The town has changed hands several times in history, most recently in 1944 when the Soviet Union captured it from Finland during World... Continue Reading →

Travel on Russia’s Olympic Train

In 2009, Russian Railways made an order with Siemens for a development of an electric multiple unit train adapted to the Russian environment. The new trains were planned to be used in Sochi for suburban passenger traffic during the 2014 Winter Olympics, and then to be partially transferred to other train lines. Now, three and a half years after the Games, you... Continue Reading →

The Aurora at Sunset – Photo tip

Having being launched on 11 May 1900 and commissioned on 29 July 1903, the Russian Cruiser Aurora stands today as the oldest commissioned ship of the Russian Navy, still flying the naval ensign under which she was commissioned (even if today it's under the care of the Central Naval Museum). She is still manned by an active service crew commanded by a Captain of the 1st Rank.

100 days, 100 posts

Time flies, when you are having fun. That's how the old saying goes and I guess it also applies when you are posting your impressions on the largest country in the world: Russia. Since June 10th, when I published my first post with the first picture I ever took in Russia, another 99 have followed,... Continue Reading →

A brief history of Russian America

Did you know that less than a century before being admitted to the USA as the 49th State Alaska was part of Russia and it was called Russian America? Alaska was actually discovered by Russia and it was part of the Russian empire until the emperor Alexander II sold 586,412 square miles (1,518,800 km2) of land to the United States on March 30, 1867 for $7.2 million.

Pygmalion’s point of view

Pictured above is Pygmalion's point of view when admiring his beloved statue/wife in the interpretation of Italian sculptor Pietro Ceccardo Staggi (1754-1814) in his Pygmalion and Galatea (1790-1792). The attribution of the statue to Staggi comes directly from the Hermitage museum, where it is on permanent display in the European Fine Art Collection, alongside statues of Antonio Canova.

Admiring the Coronation Egg at the Fabergé Museum

The Coronation Egg at the Fabergé Museum in Saint Petersburg, Russia. This, perhaps Faberge’s most iconic egg, was presented by Emperor Nicholas II (the last Emperor of Russia) to his wife, Empress Alexandra Feodorovna, as a memento of her entry into Moscow on May 26th, day of their Coronation in the Uspensky Cathedral.

Summer in Saint Petersburg

One of the most interesting (non)tourist attractions in Saint Petersburg, especially for all people coming from warmer climates, is the "beach" surrounding The Peter and Paul Fortress' external walls, on the Neva river. As a photographer, I thing this is such a great spot to try and capture "the essence of Saint Petersburg".

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