The greatest rescue operation in the Artic Ocean

In 1957 the USSR launched both the world's first nuclear-powered surface ship and the first nuclear-powered civilian vessel: the nuclear-powered icebreaker Lenin. Now permanently moored in Murmansk, the ship is an unmissable museum for anyone visiting the largest city on Earth above the Artic Circle. An embodiment of the technical progress of her time, the Lenin comprised 70,000 parts, with the total length... Continue Reading →

The Tsars’ family tree

In Russia it is often the case that the museums themselves (meaning the buildings where they are housed) are as beautiful and as interesting, if not more, than the artwork they display. One of such examples is, I think, the State Historical Museum of Russia in Moscow. Housed in one of Russia's most recognisable structures, wedged... Continue Reading →

The huge masterpiece that Tretyakov could never buy (and a Photo Tip!)

Pavel Mikhaylovich Tretyakov was a Russian businessman, patron of art, collector, and philanthropist who gave his name to the Tretyakov Gallery. The Moscow merchant acquired works by Russian artists of his day with the aim of creating a collection, which might later grow into a museum of national art. He started collecting art in the middle of 1850. The founding year of the Tretyakov Gallery is considered to be... Continue Reading →

The tank that won the war

I already wrote in a previous post (Lala Tulpan in Ufa, or “when the weather doesn’t play nice”) how my stay in Ufa was too short and definitely not "blessed" by good weather.  In spite of that the capital of Bashkortostan offered so many interesting sights I managed to take a few pictures, also as "visual... Continue Reading →

The Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center in Moscow

The Museum is located about 15 minutes walking away from the Maryina Roshcha metro station (at the exit of which you can see the Planeta VKN Youth Center): Being rather far from the city center is not a popular tourist destination. On one hand this is a shame, because it is definitely worth visiting, but on the other hand this offers you the definite advantage of seeing such an interesting place almost devoid of other visitors, especially during the week.

Bunker 42 in Moscow – a museum without its rightful heroes

If you've been reading this blog, you already know that I am deeply fascinated by Russian history and the freedom of being able to go and visit places that were once forbidden, the famous Soviet closed cities. Imagine, then, when I discovered that today you can visit a place once so secret that you were not only forbidden to visit it, but also to ever mention its very existence outside the restricted circle of a few thousand military personnel who knew about it. Bunker 42 in Moscow is a former secret military underground center for long range bomber command, now fully declassified and turned into a privately owned museum.

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